About

Jeannine Love originally hails from Cleveland and joined the Roosevelt University community in 2010 as an Assistant Professor of Public Administration where she teaches at the Chicago campus. Her research analyzes the manifestations and implications of individualism in American governance and social policy. This research explores possibilities for public and organizational participation, paying particular attention to issues of social, economic, and racial justice.

She has been working in public administration and policy since 2000, when she graduated from Ohio State University with a B.A. in Philosophy and took a position working for county government. Her undergraduate focus in applied, normative and metaethics provided a unique lens through which to experience her role as a child support caseworker and the world of policy administration. The ethical and practical inconsistencies she witnessed as a “street level bureaucrat,” particularly the problematic marginalization of the county’s poorest residents, inspired her decision to study Public Policy and Public Administration and continues to inform her approach to teaching and research.

Professor Love received a M.A. in Public Policy, with an emphasis in Philosophy and Social Policy, and a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Public Administration from George Washington University in 2005 and 2010, respectively. During her time in Washington, DC, she worked in several nationally known policy think tanks that focus on issues of poverty and economic justice: Urban Institute, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and Institute for Women’s Policy Research. At these institutions she worked on policy analysis pertaining to welfare, housing, and child care policy. She also co-facilitated an after breakfast poetry class at Miriam’s Kitchen, a soup kitchen in DC, and taught University Writing and Writing in the Disciplines courses at GW.

Dr. Love was drawn to Roosevelt by its mission of social justice and is excited to be part of a vibrant intellectual community. She is active in public administration scholarship and the pursuit of social justice through participation and service in the American Society for Public Administration, including its Section on Democracy and Social Justice, and the Public Administration Theory Network. She has published articles in American Review of Public Administration, Public Administration Quarterly, Administration & Society, and Administrative Theory & Praxis. She also serves as a referee for several journals.